Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.
The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.
Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features. 

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.

The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.

Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features.

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.
The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.
Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features. 

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.
The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.
Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features. 

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.
The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.
Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features. 

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.
The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.
Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features. 

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios
Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios

Originally built in the 1930s by French real estate company Foncière et Immobilière de Chine, the Jian Ye Li “shikumen” complex; located in the heart of the former French concession had evolved and been altered over the years but was essentially intact in its historical configuration and represented an incredible development opportunity.  Originally these “shikumen” buildings were designed for middle class families in Shanghai and as they lacked modern plumbing facilities they were often seen as products with little value to preserve and were either demolished or just the “shell” was maintained and they were converted it into commercial use.

After extensive research and study, Kokaistudios developed an architectural renovation strategy that maintained the architectural features of the “shikumen” lane houses while tastefully altering the internal layout and transforming them into spaces suitable for modern luxurious living where each original lane house unit was transformed into one luxurious guest suite. Practicality is not a term that applies to this project as the shikumen architectural typology; characterized by their narrow and tall nature meaning that the minimum 110 sq.m suites are split over 2 floors via a step staircase with no elevator; does not lend itself naturally to conversion to hospitality use. However when the ultra-luxury Capella hotel brand entered into the project several years later minimal upgrades to the architecture of the buildings were required to meet their exacting standards and they created 55 luxury suites each occupying one of the lane-houses. Today the hotel occupies a unique position within Shanghai’s luxury hotel landscape and offer their guests a truly unique hospitality experience not available anywhere else in the world.

Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios
Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios

Originally built in the 1930s by French real estate company Foncière et Immobilière de Chine, the Jian Ye Li “shikumen” complex; located in the heart of the former French concession had evolved and been altered over the years but was essentially intact in its historical configuration and represented an incredible development opportunity.  Originally these “shikumen” buildings were designed for middle class families in Shanghai and as they lacked modern plumbing facilities they were often seen as products with little value to preserve and were either demolished or just the “shell” was maintained and they were converted it into commercial use.

After extensive research and study, Kokaistudios developed an architectural renovation strategy that maintained the architectural features of the “shikumen” lane houses while tastefully altering the internal layout and transforming them into spaces suitable for modern luxurious living where each original lane house unit was transformed into one luxurious guest suite. Practicality is not a term that applies to this project as the shikumen architectural typology; characterized by their narrow and tall nature meaning that the minimum 110 sq.m suites are split over 2 floors via a step staircase with no elevator; does not lend itself naturally to conversion to hospitality use. However when the ultra-luxury Capella hotel brand entered into the project several years later minimal upgrades to the architecture of the buildings were required to meet their exacting standards and they created 55 luxury suites each occupying one of the lane-houses. Today the hotel occupies a unique position within Shanghai’s luxury hotel landscape and offer their guests a truly unique hospitality experience not available anywhere else in the world.

Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios
Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios

Originally built in the 1930s by French real estate company Foncière et Immobilière de Chine, the Jian Ye Li “shikumen” complex; located in the heart of the former French concession had evolved and been altered over the years but was essentially intact in its historical configuration and represented an incredible development opportunity.  Originally these “shikumen” buildings were designed for middle class families in Shanghai and as they lacked modern plumbing facilities they were often seen as products with little value to preserve and were either demolished or just the “shell” was maintained and they were converted it into commercial use.

After extensive research and study, Kokaistudios developed an architectural renovation strategy that maintained the architectural features of the “shikumen” lane houses while tastefully altering the internal layout and transforming them into spaces suitable for modern luxurious living where each original lane house unit was transformed into one luxurious guest suite. Practicality is not a term that applies to this project as the shikumen architectural typology; characterized by their narrow and tall nature meaning that the minimum 110 sq.m suites are split over 2 floors via a step staircase with no elevator; does not lend itself naturally to conversion to hospitality use. However when the ultra-luxury Capella hotel brand entered into the project several years later minimal upgrades to the architecture of the buildings were required to meet their exacting standards and they created 55 luxury suites each occupying one of the lane-houses. Today the hotel occupies a unique position within Shanghai’s luxury hotel landscape and offer their guests a truly unique hospitality experience not available anywhere else in the world.

Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios
Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios

Originally built in the 1930s by French real estate company Foncière et Immobilière de Chine, the Jian Ye Li “shikumen” complex; located in the heart of the former French concession had evolved and been altered over the years but was essentially intact in its historical configuration and represented an incredible development opportunity.  Originally these “shikumen” buildings were designed for middle class families in Shanghai and as they lacked modern plumbing facilities they were often seen as products with little value to preserve and were either demolished or just the “shell” was maintained and they were converted it into commercial use.

After extensive research and study, Kokaistudios developed an architectural renovation strategy that maintained the architectural features of the “shikumen” lane houses while tastefully altering the internal layout and transforming them into spaces suitable for modern luxurious living where each original lane house unit was transformed into one luxurious guest suite. Practicality is not a term that applies to this project as the shikumen architectural typology; characterized by their narrow and tall nature meaning that the minimum 110 sq.m suites are split over 2 floors via a step staircase with no elevator; does not lend itself naturally to conversion to hospitality use. However when the ultra-luxury Capella hotel brand entered into the project several years later minimal upgrades to the architecture of the buildings were required to meet their exacting standards and they created 55 luxury suites each occupying one of the lane-houses. Today the hotel occupies a unique position within Shanghai’s luxury hotel landscape and offer their guests a truly unique hospitality experience not available anywhere else in the world.

Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios
Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios

Originally built in the 1930s by French real estate company Foncière et Immobilière de Chine, the Jian Ye Li “shikumen” complex; located in the heart of the former French concession had evolved and been altered over the years but was essentially intact in its historical configuration and represented an incredible development opportunity.  Originally these “shikumen” buildings were designed for middle class families in Shanghai and as they lacked modern plumbing facilities they were often seen as products with little value to preserve and were either demolished or just the “shell” was maintained and they were converted it into commercial use.

After extensive research and study, Kokaistudios developed an architectural renovation strategy that maintained the architectural features of the “shikumen” lane houses while tastefully altering the internal layout and transforming them into spaces suitable for modern luxurious living where each original lane house unit was transformed into one luxurious guest suite. Practicality is not a term that applies to this project as the shikumen architectural typology; characterized by their narrow and tall nature meaning that the minimum 110 sq.m suites are split over 2 floors via a step staircase with no elevator; does not lend itself naturally to conversion to hospitality use. However when the ultra-luxury Capella hotel brand entered into the project several years later minimal upgrades to the architecture of the buildings were required to meet their exacting standards and they created 55 luxury suites each occupying one of the lane-houses. Today the hotel occupies a unique position within Shanghai’s luxury hotel landscape and offer their guests a truly unique hospitality experience not available anywhere else in the world.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects
Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects

Sandhill Plaza is located in one of the largest industrial parks in China, Zhangjiang High-tech Park. Designed by B+H Architects, it is a mix-use development that includes a high-rise R&D tower, office and retail buildings, and a generous amount of public space. 

Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects
Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects

Sandhill Plaza is located in one of the largest industrial parks in China, Zhangjiang High-tech Park. Designed by B+H Architects, it is a mix-use development that includes a high-rise R&D tower, office and retail buildings, and a generous amount of public space. 

Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects
Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects

Sandhill Plaza is located in one of the largest industrial parks in China, Zhangjiang High-tech Park. Designed by B+H Architects, it is a mix-use development that includes a high-rise R&D tower, office and retail buildings, and a generous amount of public space. 

Porsche Training Center
Porsche Training Center

The all-new Porsche Training Centre, the largest in the world, opened in Pudong, Shanghai in 2015. The two-story facility declares its identity with a distinctive Porsche design of jet-black cladding and sharp edges.

Porsche Training Center
Porsche Training Center

The all-new Porsche Training Centre, the largest in the world, opened in Pudong, Shanghai in 2015. The two-story facility declares its identity with a distinctive Porsche design of jet-black cladding and sharp edges.

Porsche Training Center
Porsche Training Center

The all-new Porsche Training Centre, the largest in the world, opened in Pudong, Shanghai in 2015. The two-story facility declares its identity with a distinctive Porsche design of jet-black cladding and sharp edges.

Porsche Training Center
Porsche Training Center

The all-new Porsche Training Centre, the largest in the world, opened in Pudong, Shanghai in 2015. The two-story facility declares its identity with a distinctive Porsche design of jet-black cladding and sharp edges.

Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios
Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios
Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios
Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios
Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios
Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office
Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects
Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects
Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects
Porsche Training Center
Porsche Training Center
Porsche Training Center
Porsche Training Center
Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Raffles City Hangzhou / UNStudio

Raffles City Hangzhou was designed by UNStudio for real estate company CapitaLand. It is a sustainable urban hub for living, working and leisure located in Hangzhou, one of China's most picturesque cities. Situated 180 kilometres south-west of Shanghai, Hangzhou is one of China's most prosperous cities, especially renowned for its scenic landscapes. Located in Qianjiang New Town near the Qiantang River, this mixed-use development forms a prominent landmark in Hangzhou's new central business district, with a total area of almost 400,000 square metres spread across the two 250-metre towers, the podium building and the surrounding plaza.

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.
The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.
Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features. 

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.

The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.

Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features.

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.
The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.
Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features. 

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.
The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.
Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features. 

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.
The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.
Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features. 

Financial Street (Jing An) Centre / UNStudio

The Financial Street (Jing An) Centre consists of two office buildings, one high-end residential buildings and a boutique SOHO apartment unit. The programme is distributed within four individual volumes. The residential and office towers - linked by a ground floor retail layer - are placed across the site to optimise sun orientation and reduce the casting of shadows on the plot, while simultaneously reducing impact on the surrounding buildings.
The facade design for Jing’An Plaza was developed around two principle elements. The horizontal ribbons that wrap around balconies and facade openings and the vertical shifts in the ribbons towards the main street which add a vertical articulation to the buildings and ground them on the site.
Large glass openings allow natural light into the buildings, creating optimal interior lighting conditions for the different functions and ensuring spectacular city views. On the lower levels the buildings connect to a park setting with greenery and water features. 

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

COFCO Plaza / Kokaistudios

Kokaistudios has completed the architectural and interior design renovation of COFCO Plaza. Built in 1996, the building occupies one of the best locations in Beijing, along Jianguomen street at the cross with Chang’an Avenue, 1km away from the Forbidden City. 

Two V-shaped fourteen storey office towers cut into the surrounding urban environment at a 45 degree angle. They are linked together by the central square shaped complex, creating a structure with sharp corners and a strong sense of geometry.

The re-development focused on "innovation through renovation", a concept that has guided many of Kokaistudios' previous work. The firm strived to enrich the urban fabric by re-purposing and re-examining the potential of existing buildings. The architects worked closely with COFCO to understand the brand in order to translate the culture into a spatial experience.

Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios

Originally built in the 1930s by French real estate company Foncière et Immobilière de Chine, the Jian Ye Li “shikumen” complex; located in the heart of the former French concession had evolved and been altered over the years but was essentially intact in its historical configuration and represented an incredible development opportunity.  Originally these “shikumen” buildings were designed for middle class families in Shanghai and as they lacked modern plumbing facilities they were often seen as products with little value to preserve and were either demolished or just the “shell” was maintained and they were converted it into commercial use.

After extensive research and study, Kokaistudios developed an architectural renovation strategy that maintained the architectural features of the “shikumen” lane houses while tastefully altering the internal layout and transforming them into spaces suitable for modern luxurious living where each original lane house unit was transformed into one luxurious guest suite. Practicality is not a term that applies to this project as the shikumen architectural typology; characterized by their narrow and tall nature meaning that the minimum 110 sq.m suites are split over 2 floors via a step staircase with no elevator; does not lend itself naturally to conversion to hospitality use. However when the ultra-luxury Capella hotel brand entered into the project several years later minimal upgrades to the architecture of the buildings were required to meet their exacting standards and they created 55 luxury suites each occupying one of the lane-houses. Today the hotel occupies a unique position within Shanghai’s luxury hotel landscape and offer their guests a truly unique hospitality experience not available anywhere else in the world.

Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios

Originally built in the 1930s by French real estate company Foncière et Immobilière de Chine, the Jian Ye Li “shikumen” complex; located in the heart of the former French concession had evolved and been altered over the years but was essentially intact in its historical configuration and represented an incredible development opportunity.  Originally these “shikumen” buildings were designed for middle class families in Shanghai and as they lacked modern plumbing facilities they were often seen as products with little value to preserve and were either demolished or just the “shell” was maintained and they were converted it into commercial use.

After extensive research and study, Kokaistudios developed an architectural renovation strategy that maintained the architectural features of the “shikumen” lane houses while tastefully altering the internal layout and transforming them into spaces suitable for modern luxurious living where each original lane house unit was transformed into one luxurious guest suite. Practicality is not a term that applies to this project as the shikumen architectural typology; characterized by their narrow and tall nature meaning that the minimum 110 sq.m suites are split over 2 floors via a step staircase with no elevator; does not lend itself naturally to conversion to hospitality use. However when the ultra-luxury Capella hotel brand entered into the project several years later minimal upgrades to the architecture of the buildings were required to meet their exacting standards and they created 55 luxury suites each occupying one of the lane-houses. Today the hotel occupies a unique position within Shanghai’s luxury hotel landscape and offer their guests a truly unique hospitality experience not available anywhere else in the world.

Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios

Originally built in the 1930s by French real estate company Foncière et Immobilière de Chine, the Jian Ye Li “shikumen” complex; located in the heart of the former French concession had evolved and been altered over the years but was essentially intact in its historical configuration and represented an incredible development opportunity.  Originally these “shikumen” buildings were designed for middle class families in Shanghai and as they lacked modern plumbing facilities they were often seen as products with little value to preserve and were either demolished or just the “shell” was maintained and they were converted it into commercial use.

After extensive research and study, Kokaistudios developed an architectural renovation strategy that maintained the architectural features of the “shikumen” lane houses while tastefully altering the internal layout and transforming them into spaces suitable for modern luxurious living where each original lane house unit was transformed into one luxurious guest suite. Practicality is not a term that applies to this project as the shikumen architectural typology; characterized by their narrow and tall nature meaning that the minimum 110 sq.m suites are split over 2 floors via a step staircase with no elevator; does not lend itself naturally to conversion to hospitality use. However when the ultra-luxury Capella hotel brand entered into the project several years later minimal upgrades to the architecture of the buildings were required to meet their exacting standards and they created 55 luxury suites each occupying one of the lane-houses. Today the hotel occupies a unique position within Shanghai’s luxury hotel landscape and offer their guests a truly unique hospitality experience not available anywhere else in the world.

Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios

Originally built in the 1930s by French real estate company Foncière et Immobilière de Chine, the Jian Ye Li “shikumen” complex; located in the heart of the former French concession had evolved and been altered over the years but was essentially intact in its historical configuration and represented an incredible development opportunity.  Originally these “shikumen” buildings were designed for middle class families in Shanghai and as they lacked modern plumbing facilities they were often seen as products with little value to preserve and were either demolished or just the “shell” was maintained and they were converted it into commercial use.

After extensive research and study, Kokaistudios developed an architectural renovation strategy that maintained the architectural features of the “shikumen” lane houses while tastefully altering the internal layout and transforming them into spaces suitable for modern luxurious living where each original lane house unit was transformed into one luxurious guest suite. Practicality is not a term that applies to this project as the shikumen architectural typology; characterized by their narrow and tall nature meaning that the minimum 110 sq.m suites are split over 2 floors via a step staircase with no elevator; does not lend itself naturally to conversion to hospitality use. However when the ultra-luxury Capella hotel brand entered into the project several years later minimal upgrades to the architecture of the buildings were required to meet their exacting standards and they created 55 luxury suites each occupying one of the lane-houses. Today the hotel occupies a unique position within Shanghai’s luxury hotel landscape and offer their guests a truly unique hospitality experience not available anywhere else in the world.

Capella Shanghai / Kokaistudios

Originally built in the 1930s by French real estate company Foncière et Immobilière de Chine, the Jian Ye Li “shikumen” complex; located in the heart of the former French concession had evolved and been altered over the years but was essentially intact in its historical configuration and represented an incredible development opportunity.  Originally these “shikumen” buildings were designed for middle class families in Shanghai and as they lacked modern plumbing facilities they were often seen as products with little value to preserve and were either demolished or just the “shell” was maintained and they were converted it into commercial use.

After extensive research and study, Kokaistudios developed an architectural renovation strategy that maintained the architectural features of the “shikumen” lane houses while tastefully altering the internal layout and transforming them into spaces suitable for modern luxurious living where each original lane house unit was transformed into one luxurious guest suite. Practicality is not a term that applies to this project as the shikumen architectural typology; characterized by their narrow and tall nature meaning that the minimum 110 sq.m suites are split over 2 floors via a step staircase with no elevator; does not lend itself naturally to conversion to hospitality use. However when the ultra-luxury Capella hotel brand entered into the project several years later minimal upgrades to the architecture of the buildings were required to meet their exacting standards and they created 55 luxury suites each occupying one of the lane-houses. Today the hotel occupies a unique position within Shanghai’s luxury hotel landscape and offer their guests a truly unique hospitality experience not available anywhere else in the world.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Xi'An GLP I-Park / More Design Office

MDO have completed the first two of four office towers in Xi’an’s Hi-Tech Industrial Development Zone.  The towers are the 2nd phase of a larger office campus masterplan.  At the centre of the new design is a landscaped park which acts as a green community focus for the entire campus.
A previous masterplan included all the office accommodation arranged in a single block, and MDO reorganized this area into 4 towers, creating more view corridors through the site and to the park, less overshadowing and better leasable office floor plates.
Facade
The 4 towers are designed as two pairs that are mirrored off an existing central axis.  The brief called for economic floor plates and a cost effective façade.  Recesses, obtrusions, all of these would add cost; instead we decided to treat the facades as a skin which could be enriched through careful composition, proportion, and detail.
The façade is vertically organized into bands, which increase in height as they rise, giving the towers a greater vertical emphasis.  The curtain walling is either full height glass or Apple silver aluminum panels. The proportion of glass increases the further you rise up the building.
Local codes require opening vents for smoke clearance, which usually result in awkward and unsightly windows. We wanted to maintain a clean unobstructed glass panel so decided to hide the vents behind louvered screens.  These allow the occupants to open the façade to receive fresh air without effecting the expression of the façade.
Lighting
At night we imagined the towers to create an abstract play of light, referring to arrangements of binary codes.  Aluminum panels were folded outwards to create light slots which can be seen only from certain angles. This means as you walk past, the 4 towers subtly change in appearance.
Entrances
At the base of the towers the façade is lifted up to create double-height entrance lobbies, connecting the towers directly to the landscape.  The module of the curtain wall increased so there are less visual obstructions to the view of the park.
The lobbies are treated as flexible spaces where people can work, meet and relax on specially designed furniture. To contrast against the metallic exterior, the interior spaces are lined at lower level with slatted bamboo walls, whilst above gentle folds of aluminum turn into the façade.

Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects

Sandhill Plaza is located in one of the largest industrial parks in China, Zhangjiang High-tech Park. Designed by B+H Architects, it is a mix-use development that includes a high-rise R&D tower, office and retail buildings, and a generous amount of public space. 

Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects

Sandhill Plaza is located in one of the largest industrial parks in China, Zhangjiang High-tech Park. Designed by B+H Architects, it is a mix-use development that includes a high-rise R&D tower, office and retail buildings, and a generous amount of public space. 

Sandhill Plaza / B+H Architects

Sandhill Plaza is located in one of the largest industrial parks in China, Zhangjiang High-tech Park. Designed by B+H Architects, it is a mix-use development that includes a high-rise R&D tower, office and retail buildings, and a generous amount of public space. 

Porsche Training Center

The all-new Porsche Training Centre, the largest in the world, opened in Pudong, Shanghai in 2015. The two-story facility declares its identity with a distinctive Porsche design of jet-black cladding and sharp edges.

Porsche Training Center

The all-new Porsche Training Centre, the largest in the world, opened in Pudong, Shanghai in 2015. The two-story facility declares its identity with a distinctive Porsche design of jet-black cladding and sharp edges.

Porsche Training Center

The all-new Porsche Training Centre, the largest in the world, opened in Pudong, Shanghai in 2015. The two-story facility declares its identity with a distinctive Porsche design of jet-black cladding and sharp edges.

Porsche Training Center

The all-new Porsche Training Centre, the largest in the world, opened in Pudong, Shanghai in 2015. The two-story facility declares its identity with a distinctive Porsche design of jet-black cladding and sharp edges.

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